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The whole-person approach

The school’s curriculum contributes to the development of each pupil’s sense of identity through knowledge and understanding of the moral, social, cultural and spiritual heritages of our diverse society and of the local, national and global dimensions of their lives. It encourages pupils to appreciate human aspirations and achievements and prompts personal responses and interactions.

In order to help all pupils reach their full potential, our teaching is differentiated and pupil centered to take into account our student’s varied learning styles, abilities and needs. We use a wide range of resources in our teaching and all teachers run at least one subject ‘Clinic’ throughout the week so that pupils can be given additional help and support. It is however not compulsory for staff to run these but many of them do. Many students gain great benefit from these Clinics and the assistance our resident teaching staff can give at any time over the week.

Mandatory subjects

English – Students will study either  –

  • IGCSE English Language & English Literature or
  • O Level English Language

Mathematics

  • Biology; Chemistry; Physics – examined as either 3 separate sciences or
  • Coordinated Science – less content equivalent to two IGCSE’s.

The decision about which level to be studied will be made by teaching staff following end of year 9 exams.

Optional subjects – students choose 4

IGCSE

  • Business Studies
  • Drama*
  • Economics
  • French
  • Geography
  • History
  • ICT
  • Kiswahili
  • Music*
  • Physical Education*
  • Spanish

*coursework components that will require participation outside of timetabled sessions.

BTEC Level 2

  • Art & Design
  • Media

Enrichment

  • PSHE –  develop the knowledge, skills and attributes students need to manage their lives, now and in the future. These skills and attributes help them to stay healthy & safe and prepare them for life and work; carers guidance
  • ICDL – International Computer Driving Licence – certificated course
  • Service Learning – students take on leadership roles
  • Creative arts; including LAMDA and ABRSM exams
  • Sport.
  • Greensteps programme – outdoor learning opportunities

 

February- April  Departmental discussions about what IGCSE requires, investigation into possible career choices, university requirements leading into A Level choices.

  • April – parent-student discussion on possible GCSE choices.
  • June  End of Year 9 exams; results of which will inform GCSE choices.
  • September 2020 Confirm GCSE choices

Any questions please feel free to email deputyhm@greenstedsschool.com

Brief outline of the subject/ course:

The programme of study for IGCSE Mathematics builds on work completed at KS3. IGCSE Mathematics is compulsory as the skill set it brings is essential for future employment or further study and while we encourage our pupils to appreciate the practical usefulness of Mathematics in everyday life, we also aim to make the course enjoyable.  We aim to enable as many as possible to see the elegance and beauty of Mathematics.

Studying IGCSE Mathematics will provide students with opportunities to pursue a wide range of courses at A-Level here at Greensteds International School. This will make the students competitive and versatile in the job market.

Course Content 

The Pearson Edexcel International GCSE in Mathematics requires students to demonstrate application and understanding of the following.

Number

  • Use numerical skills in a purely mathematical way and in real-life situations.

Algebra

  • Use letters as equivalent to numbers and as variables.
  • Understand the distinction between expressions, equations and formulae.
  • Use algebra to set up and solve problems.
  • Demonstrate manipulative skills.
  • Construct and use graphs.

Geometry

  • Use properties of angles.
  • Understand a range of transformations.
  • Work within the metric system.
  • Understand ideas of space and shape.
  • Use ruler, compasses and protractor appropriately.

Statistics

  • Understand basic ideas of statistical averages.
  • Use a range of statistical techniques.
  • Use basic ideas of probability.

Students should be able to demonstrate problem-solving skills by translating problems in mathematical or non-mathematical contexts into a process or a series of mathematical processes.

Students should be able to demonstrate mathematical reasoning skills by:

  • Making deductions and drawing conclusions from mathematical information
  • Constructing chains of reasoning
  • Presenting arguments and proofs
  • Interpreting and communicating information accurately

Assessment

UNITS

Two papers: 1H and 2H

  • Each paper is assessed through a 2-hour examination set and marked by Pearson.
  • The total number of marks for each paper is 100.
  • Questions will assume knowledge from the Foundation Tier subject content.
  • Each paper will assess the full range of targeted grades at Higher Tier (9–4).

An opportunity to do the exam in May/June and January/February Exam Period.

 

Other subjects that complement this.

Physics, Business, Biology, Chemistry, BTEC

 

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Students can progress from this qualification to:

  • A range of different, relevant academics courses at A-Level.
  • A-Level Mathematics
  • Further Mathematics.
  • Employment in a relevant sector
  • Further training.

Possible careers related to this subject:

  • Medicine
  • Engineering
  • Finance
  • Business
  • Architecture
  • Real Estate
  • Quantity Survey
  • Project Planning
  • Procurement and Logistics
  • Actuarial Science
  • Accounting

Personal, Social, Health &Economic Education (P.S.H.E.)

Curriculum Overview

 

Cambridge IGCSE First Language English offers candidates the opportunity to respond with understanding to a rich array of reading texts during the course as a whole. Candidates will use these texts to inform and inspire their own writing, and write in a range of text types for different purposes and audiences. Candidates will develop both their speaking and their listening skills, delivering a presentation, and responding to questions and engaging in conversations. Candidates are encouraged to become appreciative and critical readers, writers, speakers and listeners. Candidates take this syllabus alongside Literature.

Cambridge O Level English Language offers candidates the opportunity to respond confidently to a range of reading material, including fiction and non-fiction. Candidates will also have the opportunity to enhance their writing skills by writing in a range of text types for different audiences. Candidates are encouraged to become appreciative and critical readers and writers. Candidates who take this syllabus do not take Literature.

The decision about which syllabus students will follow is made following the year 9 end-of-year exams.

 

Course Content

Cambridge First Language English- (0500)

Paper 1 – Reading

Time                        2 hours

Weighting                50%

80 marks

Structured and extended writing questions Questions will be based on three reading texts

Question 1 Comprehension and summary task (30 marks).

Candidates respond to a series of sub-questions. These include short answers testing understanding of both explicit and implicit meanings based on Text A.

 

Candidates answer a selective summary task in their own words. Candidates write their summary as continuous writing of no more than 120 words based on Text B.

 

Question 2 Short-answer questions and language task (25 marks)

Candidates respond to a series of sub-questions that require answers of different lengths based on Text C.

Question 3 Extended response to reading (25 marks)

Candidates write about 250–350 words, responding in one of the following text types: letter, report, journal, speech, interview and article based on Text C.

Externally assessed.

 

Paper 2 – Directed Writing and composition

Time                                        2 hours

Weighting                                50%

80 marks

 

Section A Directed Writing (40 marks)

 

Candidates answer one compulsory question on one or two texts totalling 650–750 words in length.

Candidates use, develop and evaluate the information in the text(s) to create a discursive/argumentative/ persuasive speech, letter or article.

 

Section B Composition (40 marks)

 

Candidates answer one question from a choice of four titles: two descriptive and two narrative.

Candidates use the title to develop and write a composition.

Candidates write about 350–450 words

 

Cambridge 0- Level English – 1123

Paper 1 – Writing

Time                                                          1 hour 30 min

Weighting                                                  50%

Candidates answer two questions: the compulsory question in Section 1 and one question from Section 2.

Section 1: Directed Writing (30 marks)

Candidates are presented with one compulsory writing task. Candidates write a response of 200–300 words.

Section 2: Composition (30 marks)

Candidates complete one writing task from a choice of five descriptive/argumentative/ narrative essay titles.

Candidates write a response of 350–500 words.

 

This component is externally assessed. 60 marks

 

Paper 2 – Reading

Time                           1 hour 45 minutes

Weighting                   50%

Candidates answer all questions in both sections.

 

Section 1: Reading for Ideas (25 marks)

Candidates scan a factual text and identify key points. Candidates use their notes to produce a written summary of 150–180 words.

Candidates answer questions to identify examples of a function in the text, e.g. opinions, advice, criticism or warnings.

 

Section 2: Reading for Meaning (25 marks)

Candidates respond to questions about one narrative passage. Both passages in Paper 2 will be approximately 700 words each.

This component is externally assessed. 50 marks

 

Where can I get more information?

CAIE  website.https://www.cambridgeinternational.org/

 

Other subjects that complement this: Literature, Drama,History, Music, Media, Sociology, Psychology

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

The combination of knowledge and skills in Cambridge IGCSE First Language English gives learners a solid foundation for further study. Candidates who achieve grades A* to C are well prepared to follow a wide range of courses including Cambridge International AS & A Level English Language.

Cambridge IGCSEs are accepted and valued by leading universities and employers around the world as evidence of  academic achievement. Many universities require a combination of Cambridge International AS & A Levels and Cambridge IGCSEs or equivalent to meet their entry requirements.

Cambridge O Levels are general qualifications that enable candidates to progress either directly to employment, or to proceed to further qualifications. Candidates who are awarded grades C to A* in Cambridge O Level English Language are well prepared to follow courses leading to Cambridge International AS and A Level English Language, or the equivalent.

Possible careers related to this subject

  • Journalism
  • Publishing
  • Law
  • Writing
  • Marketing
  • Public Relations
  • Education consultant
  • Web content management

Cambridge IGCSE Information and Communication Technology encourages learners to develop lifelong skills including:

  • Understanding and using applications
  • Using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to solve problems
  • Analysing, designing, implementing, testing and evaluating ICT systems, ensuring that they are fit for purpose
  • Understanding the implications of technology in society, including social, economic and ethical uses
  • Awareness of the ways ICT can help in home, learning and work environments.

The ICT course balances a thorough knowledge and understanding of ICT and help to develop the skills learners need for their next steps in education or employment.

IGCSE ICT provides the following course content:

  1. Types and components of computer systems
  2. Input and output devices
  3. Storage devices and media
  4. Networks and the effects of using them
  5. The effects of using IT
  6. ICT applications
  7. The systems life cycle
  8. Safety and security
  9. Audience
  10. Communication
  11. File management
  12. Images
  13. Layout
  14. Styles
  15. Proofing
  16. Graphs and charts
  17. Document production
  18. Data manipulation
  19. Presentations
  20. Data analysis
  21. Website authoring

Assessment

The IGCSE. ICT course has both written and practical “hands-on” exams.

Paper 1 –  Theory 2 hours.   The paper will have 100 marks but account for 40% of the total marks.  Questions will be based on sections 1–21 of the subject content. All questions are compulsory and Externally assessed.

Paper 2:  Practical. 2 hours 30 minutes. It will cover the topics – Document Production, Data Manipulation and Presentations. It will have 80 marks but will account for 30% of the total marks. This test assesses the practical skills needed to use the applications covered in sections 17, 18 and 19 of the subject content.  Candidates must demonstrate the practical skills relevant to sections 11–16. All tasks are compulsory and it is externally assessed.

Paper 3: Practical.  2 hours 30 minutes. It will cover the topics – Data Analysis and Website Authoring It will have 80 marks but will account for 30% of the total marks. This test assesses the practical skills needed to use the applications covered in sections 20 and 21 of the subject content.  Candidates must demonstrate the practical skills relevant to sections 11–16. All tasks are compulsory and externally assessed.

Other subjects that complement this: Physics, Media Studies

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

  1. A-Level IT
  2. A-Level Computer Science
  3. BTEC IT
  4. Bachelor of Business Information Technology
  5. Bachelor of Computer Information Technology
  6. Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Computer Science
  7. Bachelor of Applied Science (BASc) in Computer Science
  8. Bachelor of Computer Security in Computer Science
  9. Bachelor of Computing in Computer Science
  10. Bachelor of Engineering (BEng) in Computer Science
  11. Bachelor of Science in Engineering (Computer Science) – BSE (CS)
  12. Bachelor of Science (BSc or BS) in Computer Science (BSc CS or BSCS or BSc (Comp))
  13. Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

 

We live in a media-saturated world. From video clips on your phone, to TV ads to blockbuster movies, to posters at the bus stop, to the music in your earbuds, you are surrounded by media messages for most of your waking hours. How do you make sense of them all? How do you know what they are trying to communicate — both on an obvious and a less obvious level? How do you know how much you have been influenced — consciously or subconsciously — by these media messages? Does the media reflect your reality, or control the way you view it?

It’s been said that media literacy is as important to living in the 21st century as regular literacy was to the 20th century. Media Studies helps you develop an important set of skills that will help you navigate the rest of your education and then, your working life. Media Studies will help you increase your knowledge and understanding of:

  • Communication
  • Design
  • Planning
  • Presentation
  • Evaluation
  • Creativity
  • Critical Thinking
  • Research
  • Story-telling
  • Technology
  • Politics
  • Business
  • Culture
  • Citizenship

Through optional units the BTEC International Level 2 Certificate offers flexibility and a choice of emphasis in the course. It provides an engaging programme for those who are clear about the vocational area they wish to explore through further study or for those who wish to gain skills for the media industry. The qualification has the potential to prepare learners for progression to other BTEC Level 3 programmes and A Level subjects of their choice.

Course Content

Unit 1: Research for Creative Media Production

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to develop skills in the main research methods and techniques used within the creative media sector. Learners will do this through researching an existing media product and through undertaking research for one of their own production projects.

Outcomes of learning

On completion of this unit a learner should:

  1. Know about research methods and techniques
  2. Be able to use research methods and techniques to investigate an existing media product
  3. Be able to use research methods and techniques to gather material for a media production
  4. Be able to present results of research.

Unit 6: Print Production

This unit aims to develop learners’ understanding of print production techniques and technology. Learners will be introduced to ways of developing ideas for print products, and will investigate and practise hand, mechanical and digital print production methods.

Outcomes of learning

On completion of this unit a learner should:

  1. Know about print production technologies and techniques
  2. Be able to develop ideas for printed material
  3. Be able to create print products
  4. Be able to review own print production work.

Assessment

All coursework units are internally assessed and externally verified by an examiner from Pearson.

Other subjects that complement this.

English, Media Studies, Music, Music Technology, Business, Marketing, Economics, ICT, Drama and Art.

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Journalism, Public Relations, Advertising, International Relations, Corporate Communications, Graphics Design, Marketing, Business Administration, Communications, Media Studies etc

Business Studies provides students with a unique insight into the world of work. Through its study, students discover how and why businesses operate in the way they do and learn about their key elements and business functions. The knowledge, and the holistic understanding that it develops are invaluable to students and can open a wide range of opportunities for further learning and employment.

Understanding business activity

  • Business activity
  • Classification of businesses
  • Enterprise, business growth and size
  • Types of business organization
  • Business objectives and stakeholder objectives

 People in business

  • Motivating workers
  • Organization and management
  • Recruitment, selection, and training of workers
  • Internal and external communication

Marketing

  • Marketing, competition and the customer
  • Market research
  • Marketing mix
  • Marketing strategy

Operations management

  • Production of         goods and      services
  • Costs, the scale of production and break-even analysis
  • Achieving quality production
  • Location decisions

Financial information and decisions

  • Business finance: needs and sources
  • Cash-flow forecasting and working capital
  • Income statements
  • Balance sheets
  • Analysis of accounts

  External influences on business activity

  • Government economic objectives and policies
  • Environmental and ethical issues
  • Business and the international economy

Other subjects that complement this. Economics

 

Economics teaches students to think logically and to use theories to understand how economies operate.  At the center of the subject is the question of how we divide up our scarce resources and how decisions resulting from this affect us all –  in other words, who gets what and why? It, therefore, studies all of society and the activities of various groups and institutions within it.

The basic economic problem

The first section of the syllabus introduces the fundamental ideas and concepts that underpin the study of economics including the basic economic problem, factors of production, opportunity cost, and production possibility curves.

The allocation of resources

The fundamental principles of resource allocation are considered through the price mechanism in a market economy. The market forces of demand and supply, market equilibrium and disequilibrium, and elasticity form the core of this section.

Microeconomic decision-makers

The microeconomy is an important area of study, and the approach to learning taken here is through the role of the major decision-makers: banks, households, workers, trade unions and firms.

Government and the macroeconomy

Governments have different macroeconomic aims, and conflicts often arise between the choice of measures used to achieve them. Variables must be measured to consider the causes and consequences of change, and appropriate policies applied.

Economic development

As an economy develops there will be changes in population, living standards, poverty and income redistribution. Therefore, the effects of changes in the size and structure of the population and of other influences on development in a variety of countries are explored.

International trade and globalisation

The importance of trade between countries and the growth of globalisation is explored. Principles such as specialisation, the role of free trade, the role of multinational companies, foreign exchange rates and balance of payments stability are considered.

Careers

Business Studies offers an excellent foundation for those wishing to pursue careers in management, marketing, finance, project management, financial accounting, management accounting, human resources, hospitality and leisure management, and business journalism.

Other subjects that complement this. Business Studies

The aims of this course:

To enable students to get:

  • An understanding of location on a local, regional and global scale
  • An awareness of the characteristics, distribution and processes affecting contrasting physical and human environments
  • An understanding of the ways in which people interact with each other and with their environment
  • An awareness of the contrasting opportunities and constraints presented by different environments
  • An appreciation of and concern for the environment
  • An appreciation of the earth including its people, places, landscapes, natural processes and phenomena.

Course Content  

The syllabus is divided into three themes:

  • Theme 1: Population and settlement
  • Theme 2: The natural environment
  • Theme 3: Economic development.

The themes are designed to develop an understanding of natural and human environments.

 

Assessment

All candidates take three papers. All candidates take Paper 1 and Paper 2, and at Greensteds we take Paper 4.

 

Paper 1: 1 hour 45 minutes

Geographical Themes   45% – 75 marks

Candidates answer three questions, each worth 25 marks.

Candidates must answer one question from each section

Externally assessed

 

Paper 2: 1 hour 30 minutes

Geographical Skills   27.5% – 60 marks

Candidates answer all the questions

Externally assessed

 

Paper 4: 1 hour 30 minutes

Alternative to Coursework     27.5%-  60 marks

Candidates answer two compulsory questions, completing a series of written tasks

Externally assessed

 

Where can I get more information: Miss P Toley and Mr A Stephens

 

Other subjects that complement this.

All subjects complement Geography well given its wide range range of topics taught. Science subjects go well with the Physical Geography. Business Studies and Economics go well with the Human Geography part of the course

 

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

BA or Bsc Geography Degree at University An Environmental Sciences based degree at University

International relations degree at University

Town planning Degree at University

Geography based diplomas

The course encourages learners to develop lifelong skills, including:

  • The ability to use a foreign language as a means of practical communication
  • Insight into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken
  • A positive attitude towards language learning, towards the speakers of other languages, and towards other cultures and civilisations
  • Techniques that can be applied to other areas of learning, such as analysis and memory skills
  • A sound foundation for progression to employment or further study. The programmes balance a thorough knowledge and understanding of a subject and help to develop the skills learners need for their next steps in education or employment.

Course Content

The subject content is organised around five broad Topic areas which provide contexts for the acquisition of vocabulary and the study of grammar and structures. Through the study of these Topic areas, candidates gain insight into target language countries and communities.

The Topic areas are:

  • Everyday activities
  • Personal and social life
  • The world around us
  • The world of work
  • The international world

Assessment

All candidates take four papers.

–  Paper 1 approximately 45 minutes Listening 25% 45 marks Candidates listen to a number of recordings and answer questions testing comprehension. Externally assessed

–  Paper 2 1 hour Reading 25% 45 marks Candidates read a number of texts and answer questions testing comprehension. Externally assessed.

 Paper 3 approximately 15 minutes Speaking* 25% 100 marks Candidates complete two role plays, a topic presentation/conversation and a general conversation. Internally assessed/externally moderated

–  Paper 4 1 hour Writing 25% 50 marks Candidates respond in the target language to three tasks Externally assessed

Where can I get more information: Mr. Tsove & Mr. Domingo

Other subjects that complement this: English & Literature

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Almost all languages will facilitate you in careers or in the country where the language is spoken.

The course encourages learners to develop lifelong skills, including

  • The ability to use a foreign language as a means of practical communication.
  • Insight into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken.
  • A positive attitude towards language learning, towards the speakers of other languages,    and towards other cultures and civilisations.
  • Techniques that can be applied to other areas of learning, such as analysis and memory skills.
  • A sound foundation for progression to employment or further study. The programmes balance a thorough knowledge and understanding of a subject and help to develop the skills learners need for their next steps in education or employment.

 

Course Content

The subject content is organised around five broad Topic areas which provide contexts for the acquisition of vocabulary and the study of grammar and structures. Through the study of these Topic areas, candidates gain insight into target language countries and communities.

The Topic areas are:

  • Everyday activities
  • Personal and social life
  • The world around us
  • The world of work
  • The international world

Assessment

All candidates take four papers.

  • Paper 1 two hours Reading and Writing 67% 60 marks. Written examination consisting of six exercises that test a range of reading and writing skills. The task types are short answer questions, multiple matching, note-making, summary writing, functional writing and extended writing. Externally assessed.
  • Paper 2 Listening paper, approximately 35–45 minutes,33% 30 marks. Candidates listen to recordings of short and longer spoken texts. The task types are short answer questions, gap-fill sentences, multiple matching and multiple-choice questions. Externally assessed.
  • Component 3 Speaking Approximately 10–12 minutes. Separately endorsed 60 marks

The Speaking test consists of three parts: candidates give a two- to the three-minute presentation, followed by a short discussion with the examiner about the presentation, followed by a short conversation with the examiner about general topics. Internally assessed and externally moderated

 

Where can I get more information: Mr. Domingo & Mr. Tsove

Other subjects that complement this: Spanish, French, English & Literature.

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Almost all languages will facilitate you in careers or in the country where the language is spoken.

When studying the Cambridge IGCSE Music syllabus, learners listen to, perform and compose music, encouraging aesthetic and emotional development, self-discipline and, importantly, creativity. As a result, learners enhance their appreciation and enjoyment of music, an achievement that forms an ideal foundation for future study and enhances lifelong musical enjoyment.

Learners study music of all styles; each style is placed in its historical and cultural context, and learners are

encouraged to be perceptive, sensitive and critical when listening.

Learners studying Cambridge IGCSE Music are given the opportunity to:

  • listen to and learn about music from a wide range of historical periods and major world cultures
  • develop their skills in performing music, both individually and in a group with other musicians
  • develop their skills in composing music in a style of their own choice.

 

Course Content

Listening

Candidates should be taught to recognise and describe the musical features on the following list, which provides a clear indication of the range of knowledge expected in the examination.

Rudiments – Standard staff notation including dynamic, tempo and expression markings, simple ornaments and articulation signs, treble, bass and alto clefs, key signatures up to 4 sharps and 4 flats in major and minor keys, time signatures, major, minor and perfect intervals.

-Melody and rhythm – Major, minor, chromatic, whole-tone and pentatonic scales. Blue notes. Melodic movement (ascending or descending by step or leap). Phrasing. Call and response. Duple, triple or irregular metre. Syncopation, swing, polyrhythm.

-Harmony – Primary chords: I, IV, and V(7); secondary chords: II and VI. Perfect, imperfect and interrupted cadences. Modulations to related keys (sub-dominant, dominant, relative minor, relative major).

-Ensembles and instruments/voices – Western ensembles and instruments: orchestras, jazz bands, choirs and chamber music ensembles. The main instruments and voices used in the above ensembles. World ensembles and instruments: Indonesian,  African, Arab, Indian: Chinese, Japanese, Latin American.

-Instrumental and/or vocal effects: Arco, pizzicato, glissando, tremolo, double-stopping, strumming, pitch bending, mute, roll, melisma.

Structure – Binary, ternary, rondo, theme and variations, ground bass.

-Compositional devices – Repetition, imitation, sequence, canon, ostinato, drone, Alberti bass, pedal (tonic and dominant), contrary motion.

-Texture – Melody and accompaniment, homophonic and polyphonic, monophonic, heterophonic, parallel motion.

-Style – Baroque, Classical, Romantic, Twentieth Century (including impressionism, neoclassicism, jazz, minimalism).

-Genre – Opera, oratorio (including recitative, aria and chorus), musical, symphony, concerto, string quartet, sonata, march,waltz, minuet and trio.

 

Performing

Component 2 consists of prepared performances of the candidate’s own choice, all of which must be recorded.

Candidates must:

(i) sing or play individually – either one piece or two short contrasting pieces (which should be on the same

instrument)

and

(ii) sing or play in an ensemble – either one piece or two short contrasting pieces (which should be on the same

instrument – but this does not need to be the same instrument as that offered for individual performing).

 

Composing

Candidates submit two compositions, written for different instruments and/or voices, which must be recorded.

 

Assessment:

Listening / written tests, Solo/ group performance graded on given criteria.

Component 1: Listening 1 hour 15 minutes Candidates answer all questions. 70 marks Externally assessed. 40%

Component 2: Performing. 30%  Internally assessed / externally moderated.

Component 3: Composing 30%   Internally assessed / externally moderated.

 

Where can I get more information:

  • Kelvin Mwita
  • Ernest Kisali
  • CIE, Edexcel. ABRSM websites.

Other subjects that complement this: Media, Drama, Literature, Sports.

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

BTEC Music; B.Ed Music, B.Mus,

Cambridge IGCSE Co-ordinated Sciences gives learners the opportunity to study biology, chemistry and physics within a scientifically coherent syllabus and is accepted by universities and employers as proof of essential knowledge and ability.

Course Content  

Candidates can either follow the Core syllabus only, or they can follow the Extended syllabus which includes both the Core and the Supplement. Candidates aiming for grades A*A* to CC should follow the Extended syllabus.

 

Topics studied:

Biology

  • B1 Characteristics of living organisms
  • B2 Cells
  • B3 Biological molecules
  • B4 Enzymes
  • B5 Plant nutrition
  • B6 Animal nutrition
  • B7 Transport
  • B8 Gas exchange and respiration
  • B9 Coordination and response
  • B10 Reproduction
  • B11 Inheritance
  • B12 Organisms and their environment
  • B13 Human influences on ecosystems

Chemistry

  • C1 The particulate nature of matter
  • C2 Experimental techniques
  • C3 Atoms, elements and compounds
  • C4 Stoichiometry
  • C5 Electricity and chemistry
  • C6 Energy changes in chemical reactions
  • C7 Chemical reactions
  • C8 Acids, bases and salts
  • C9 The Periodic Table
  • C10 Metals
  • C11 Air and water
  • C12 Sulfur
  • C13 Carbonates
  • C14 Organic chemistry

 

Physics

  • P1 Motion
  • P2 Work, energy and power
  • P3 Thermal physics
  • P4 Properties of waves, including light and sound
  • P5 Electricity and magnetism
  • P6 Electric circuits
  • P7 Electromagnetic effects
  • P8 Atomic physics

Assessment

Core

  • Paper 1: Multiple-choice  45 mins. 40 marks. 30%
  • Paper 3: Structured Questions 2 hours 120 marks. 50%
  • Paper 5: Practical Skills 2 hours. 60 marks. 20%

All papers are externally assessed

 

Additional

  • Paper 2: Multiple-choice  45 mins. 40 marks. 30%
  • Paper 4: Structured Questions 2 hours 120 marks. 50%
  • Paper 5: Practical Skills 2 hours. 60 marks. 20%

 

Where can I get more information: David Green

Other subjects that complement this: Mathematics, English

 

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Any student intending to take science subjects at A-Level should ideally take the individual sciences route, studying Physics, Chemistry and Biology. This course will however give students a solid grounding in the scientific method, problem-solving skills and applied mathematics which provide a good foundation for further study in non-specialist subjects.

This involves the study of elements and compounds; their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes that they undergo during a reaction with other substances. Chemistry allow learners to recognize that science is evidence-based and understand the usefulness, and the limitations, of the scientific method.

 

Course Content                                                                                 

The syllabus provides candidates with an opportunity to study both the practical and theoretical aspects of Chemistry. It also helps learners develop the knowledge and skills that will prepare them for successful university study. Our learners also develop lifelong skills of scientific inquiry, confidence in technology, and communication and teamwork skills. It is also designed to inspire an interest in scientific study. Candidates will study all of the following topics:

  1. The particulate nature of matter
  2. Experimental techniques
  3. Atoms, elements and compounds
  4. Stoichiometry
  5. Electricity and chemistry
  6. Chemical energetics
  7. Chemical reactions
  8. Acids, bases and salts
  9. The Periodic Table
  10. Metals
  11. Air and water
  12. Sulfur
  13. Carbonates
  14. Organic chemistry

 

Assessment

Student can either sit for Paper 1,3 and 5 OR Paper 2,4 and 3

Paper 1: Core: Multiple Choice 45 minutes. 40 marks.  (30%  )
Paper 2: Extended Structured Questions 45 minutes. 40 marks. (30% )
Paper 3: Core Structured Skills 1 hours 15 minutes. 80 marks.  (50% )|
Paper 4:  Extended Structured Questions 1 hour 15 minutes. 80 marks. (50%)
Paper 5: Practical 1 hour 15 minutes. 40 marks. (20%)

 

All papers are externally assessed

Where can I get more information: www.cambridgeinternational.org

Other subjects that complement this. Biology, Physics, Physical Education, Psychology, Geography

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

  • BSc in Chemistry BSc in Biomedical Sciences
  • BSc in Analytical Chemistry
  • BSc in Forensic Science
  • BSc in Geochemistry
  • BSc in Biochemistry
  • BSc in Pharmacology
  • BSc in Toxicology
  • BSc in Chemical Engineering
  • BSc in Nanotechnology
  • Medical Degree

The aims of this course are to enable students to:

  • Increase their understanding of the technological world
  • Take an informed interest in scientific matters
  • Recognise the usefulness (and limitations) of the scientific method, and how to apply this to other disciplines and in everyday life
  • Develop relevant attitudes, such as a concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, inquiry, initiative and inventiveness
  • Develop an interest in, and care for, the environment
  • Better understand the influences and limitations placed on the scientific study by society, economy, technology, ethics, the community and the environment
  • Develop an understanding of the scientific skills essential for both further study and everyday life.

Course Content 

  • Characteristics and classification of living organisms
  • Organisation of the organism
  • Movement in and out of cells
  • Biological molecules
  • Enzymes
  • Plant nutrition
  • Human nutrition
  • Transport in plants
  • Transport in animals
  • Diseases and immunity
  • Gas exchange in humans
  • Respiration
  • Excretion in humans
  • Coordination and response
  • Drugs
  • Reproduction
  • Inheritance
  • Variation and selection
  • Organisms and their environment
  • Biotechnology and genetic engineering
  • Human influences on ecosystems

Assessment

All candidates take three papers. Candidates who entered for Core Biology take equivalent papers with a maximum grade of a C. All students who choose the triple award individual sciences tend to sit the Additional papers, aiming for higher grades.

Paper 1: Multiple Choice Paper – 45 minutes – 30% of total mark 40 questions
Paper 2: Theory Paper – 1 hour 15 minutes – 50% of total mark
Paper 4: Practical Paper – 1 hour 15 minutes – 20% of total mark

 

Where can I get more information: Mr Rob Bailey and Ms Olivia Jefferson

Other subjects that complement this: Maths, Physics, Chemistry, English

 

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

A level Biology

Further education courses in Biology, Biochemistry, Medicine, Environmental Science or Psychology

 

 

The course encourages learners to develop lifelong skills, including • the ability to use a foreign language as a means of practical communication • insight into the culture and civilisation of countries where the language is spoken • a positive attitude towards language learning, towards the speakers of other languages, and towards other cultures and civilisations • techniques which can be applied to other areas of learning, such as analysis and memory skills • a sound foundation for progression to employment or further study. The programmes balance a thorough knowledge and understanding of a subject and help to develop the skills learners need for their next steps in education or employment.

Course Content  

The subject content is organised around five broad Topic areas which provide contexts for the acquisition of vocabulary and the study of grammar and structures. Through the study of these Topic areas, candidates gain insight into target language countries and communities.

The Topic areas are:

  • Everyday activities
  • Personal and social life
  • The world around us
  • The world of work
  • The international world

Assessment

All candidates take four papers.

–  Paper 1 approximately 45 minutes Listening 25% 45 marks Candidates listen to a number of recordings and answer questions testing comprehension. Externally assessed

–  Paper 2 1 hour Reading 25% 45 marks Candidates read a number of texts and answer questions testing comprehension. Externally assessed.

 Paper 3 approximately 15 minutes Speaking* 25% 100 marks Candidates complete two role plays, a topic presentation/conversation and a general conversation. Internally assessed/externally moderated

–  Paper 4 1 hour Writing 25% 50 marks Candidates respond in the target language to three tasks Externally assessed

 

Where can I get more information: Mr. Domingo & Mr. Tsove

Other subjects that complement this: English & Literature

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Almost all languages will facilitate you in careers or in the country where the language is spoken

The purpose (aims) of IGCSE History are:

  • Stimulate interest in and enthusiasm for learning about the past.
  • Promote the acquisition of knowledge and understanding of individuals, people and societies in the past.
  • Ensure that learners’ knowledge is rooted in an understanding of the nature and use of historical evidence.
  • Promote an understanding of key historical concepts: cause and consequence, change and continuity, and similarity and difference.
  • Provide a sound basis for further study and the pursuit of personal interest.
  • Encourage international understanding.
  • Encourage the development of historical skills, including investigation, analysis, evaluation and communication skills.

Course Content

The syllabus offers candidates an opportunity to examine Historical events through a variety of sources and encourages inquiry towards the acquisition of knowledge and lifelong skills.

The topics studied are as follows:

Core Content

All topics in the core content must be studied. These are:

The twentieth century: International relations since 1919

The content focuses on the following Key Questions:

  • Were the peace treaties of 1919–23 fair?
  • To what extent was the League of Nations a success?
  • Why had international peace collapsed by 1939?
  • Who was to blame for the Cold War?
  • How effectively did the United States contain the spread of Communism?
  • How secure was the USSR’s control over Eastern Europe, 1948–c.1989?
  • Why did events in the Gulf matter, c.1970–2000?

Depth study

In addition, all candidates must also study at least one of the following Depth Studies:

  • The First World War, 1914–18
  • Germany, 1918–45
  • Russia, 1905–41
  • The United States, 1919–41
  • China, c.1930–c.1990
  • South Africa, c.1940–c.1994
  • Israelis and Palestinians since 1945

Assessment

Paper 1: Written paper

2 Hours long. 60 marks. 40%

Candidates answer two questions from

Section A (Core Content) and one question from Section B (Depth Studies)

All questions are in the form of structured essays, split into three parts: (a), (b) and (c)

Externally assessed

 

Paper 2: Written paper

2 Hours. 50 marks. 33%

Candidates answer six questions on one prescribed topic taken from the Core Content.

There is a range of source material relating to each prescribed topic.

The prescribed topic changes in each examination session.

Externally assessed

 

Paper 4: Alternative to Coursework- Written paper

1 hours. 40 marks. 27%
Candidates answer one question on a Depth Study.
Externally assessed.

 

Where can I get more information: Mr. Stanslous Bukachi and Ms. Zoyler Simiyu

Other subjects that complement this: Literature in English, Art, Geography

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

Law, International relations, Research analysis, Journalism, Political Science, Post-Secondary History researcher

The Cambridge IGCSE Physics syllabus helps learners to understand the technological world in which they live, and take an informed interest in science and scientific developments. They learn about the basic principles of Physics through a mix of theoretical and practical studies. Learners also develop an understanding of the scientific skills essential for further study at Cambridge International A Level, skills which are useful in everyday life.

Course Content  

  • General physics
  • Thermal physics
  • Properties of waves, including light and sound
  • Electricity and magnetism
  • Atomic physics

Assessment

All candidates take three papers. Candidates who entered for Core Physics take equivalent papers with a maximum grade of a C. All students who choose the triple award individual sciences tend to sit the Additional papers, aiming for higher grades.

Paper 1: Multiple Choice Paper – 45 minutes – 30% of total mark 40 questions
Paper 2: Theory Paper – 1 hour 15 minutes – 50% of total mark
Paper 4: Practical Paper – 1 hour 15 minutes – 20% of total mark

Where can I get more information: Mr. Kelvin Ombori and Mr. Godfrey Ochieng

Other subjects that complement this: Maths, Biology, Chemistry, English

 

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

The transferrable skills acquired in Physics are considered very highly in courses and careers that might seem unrelated, such as banking and finance, engineering and business management.

A level Physics or Mathematics

Further education courses in Physics, Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Business Management and Economics.

The students are able to learn a range of skills by reflecting on their own performance monitoring their progress with handy checklist.  It deepens their knowledge and understanding of key physical education topics, exploring how theoretical topics relate to practical performance.  Students find out more about sports that are familiar to them, as well as some they have not tried.

Course Content  

The syllabus provides learners with an opportunity to study both the practical and theoretical aspects of physical education. It is designed to encourage enjoyment in physical activity by providing learners with an opportunity to take part in a range of physical activities and develop an understanding of effective and safe physical performance. This helps learners to develop an appreciation of the necessity for a sound understanding of the principles, practices and training that underpin improved performance, better health and well-being.

Candidates will study all of the following topics:

1: Anatomy and physiology
2: Health, fitness and training
3: Skill acquisition and psychology
4: Social, cultural and ethical influences

Candidates will also undertake four different physical activities chosen from at least two of the seven categories given in the coursework. Physical activities make a significant contribution to syllabus aims and objectives, serving as a source of material to facilitate learning.

Assessment

All candidates take two compulsory components.

 

Paper 1: Theory 1 hour 45 minutes Candidates answer all questions. (100 marks)

Externally assessed:  Weighting (50%)

Component 2: Coursework Candidates undertake four physical activities from at least two of the seven categories listed.

Internally assessed / externally moderated. Weighting (50%)

 

Where can I get more information: Leonard Atto

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

BSc Sports science at University
BSc in  Sports Medicine at University
BTec Sport in A-levels

This 2 year course introduces candidates to subject areas linked to the creative industries. Through projects and assignments candidates explore the processes involved in developing and making art and design work. They also develop their critical and written skills. Students can progress to Fine Art, Photography, Textiles or Product Design, AS and A Level courses or can also progress on to employment.

 

Course outline

The course aims to provide a broad-based approach to the art and design sector:

Yr 10 Unit 1: Contextual reference to Art and Design, focusing on Body Adornment

Yr 10 Unit 2: 2D Visual Communication, focusing on drawing from Nature with an emphasis on skill and technique.

Yr 11 Unit 3: 3D Visual Communication, working with mixed media and clay/ paper mache’/Wood/ soft stone/Soap to create 3D natural cocoons.

Yr 11 Unit 4: Using ideas to explore develop and produce Art and design, focusing on the production of outcomes, a partial element from the units above.

 

Why Choose This Course?

  • This course provides excellent personal and professional support for students completing the qualification.
  • The course involves live assignments with local employers.

 

What Do Students Learn?

2D and 3D visual communication, painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture, graphic design and working with computers. Students build excellent portfolios of art and design work to use in their next stage interviews.

They also develop their functional skills in Maths and English.

 

Assessment

Edexcel Level 2 BTEC Extended Certificate. The award has 4 units and students can achieve a pass, merit or distinction which is equivalent to 2 GCSE grades A* – C

BTEC Art is 100% coursework with no final exam however final pieces are set within a strict timeline.

The vocational context of the course is important. Students go on several trips and gallery visits as well as visiting speakers and practicing artists. Each project has a clear brief and a breakdown of the assignment criteria. This enables students to track progress and performance.

Where can I get more information: Ms. Jackie Kalumu and Mr. Oliver Omotto

Other subjects that complement this: English, Math, Media Studies, ICT

What further study can I undertake in this subject?

  • Animation BA Honours
  • Fine Art Mixed Media BA Honours
  • Graphic Communication Design BA Honours
  • Illustration and Visual Communication BA Honours
  • Architecture BA Honours
  • Fashion Design BA Honours
  • Interior Design BA Honours
  • Web Design BA Honours
  • Sculpture BA Honours
  • Ceramics BA Honours
  • BA in Art and Design
  • Ed Arts Fine Art

 

 

For any inquiries call the hotline: +254(770)-076271